Archive for the ‘Employee Engagement’ category

Catching Up with ADP

June 20, 2013
Linda Merritt, HRO Research Analyst, NelsonHall

Linda Merritt, HRO Research Analyst, NelsonHall

The recent passing of long-term U.S. Senator Frank Lautenberg reminds us of his early role in the formation of what became ADP, a founding member of HR outsourcing. In the early 1950s he was engaged in selling insurance and sold a policy to two young New Jersey businessmen, Henry and Joseph Taub. The Taub’s were pioneering a then new concept; payroll outsourcing. The brothers knew payroll processing and Lautenberg knew sales and marketing. Lautenberg took a risk and joined the Taub brothers and together they created a new industry.

Establish Operating Principles

By the time the company incorporated in 1961 the three leaders established principles that still guide the company some 60 years later. Following are a few of the principles they put in place.

Focus on Business Markets that Offer Significant Growth Opportunities

ADP has always pursued growth through new market opportunities, both by expanding it service lines and by entering new geographies. Much of the early growth was through acquisitions, as well as organic growth. Lautenberg retired as CEO from ADP in 1982 having made over 100 acquisitions!

Over time, ADP became a global player. An early acquisition was GSI, a large payroll and HR services company in Europe. The latest 2013 acquisition is Payroll S.A. to expand LATAM payroll capabilities to Chile, Argentina, and Peru. In the last few years major acquisitions included Workscape (benefits), The RightThing (RPO) and SHPS (benefits).

Embrace Technological Change to Enhance Product and Service Offerings

By the early 1960s ADP had moved from manual operations to the pre-computer punch cards and on to leasing its first computer: an IBM 1401 mainframe. That willingness to continue to embrace the new is seen in ADP’s successful launch of a series of cloud-based SaaS HR technology and BPO service platforms, including Workforce Now (1k-20K employees), Vantage HCM (50-3k employees), and GlobalView for multi-nationals. Together, the three services support more than 40k clients.

The company has also launched extensive mobility options, including RUN powered by ADP for small business mobile payroll and ADP Mobile Solutions for access to a broad range of information and transactions spanning time and attendance to benefits and pay cards.

Attract and Retain Motivated and Talented People

ADP has grown into a $10bn global outsourcing business with one of only four remaining AAA credit ratings in the U.S. With ~570k clients across 125 countries, we know customers support its line-up of services and proprietary developed technologies. What about people? A few recent awards tell the story:

  • Ranked second on Fortune’s 2012 list of America’s Most Admired Companies in Financial Data Service
  • Ranked in the Top 50 on IDG’s Computerworld 2012 list of the 100 Best Places to Work in Information Technology (IT)
  • Named to the 2012 Working Mother 100 Best Companies, for the third time.

We therefore need to ask the question of prospective purchasers: does your prospective or current HRO service provider have long-term guiding principles and can you see evidence of them in action? Because ADP does.

Interested in reading the latest HRO news from NelsonHall? Subscribe to our newsletter by clicking here.

Advertisements

Pinstripe’s RPO Analyst Day: Talent Forward

May 21, 2013
Gary Bragar, HRO Research Director, NelsonHall

Gary Bragar, HRO Research Director, NelsonHall

I attended Pinstripe’s analyst day on May 15, 2013. It was combined with its Client Talent Forward Summit, with the theme “Commitment to Innovation”. Highlights of the day included:

Client Panel

Pinstripe discussed 10 recent innovations, of which a panel of four Pinstripe clients then discussed a few Pinstripe innovations that have benefitted their business, including:

  • Email campaigning: A proactive approach to creating candidate pools with active and passive candidates. This enables messaging a high number of candidates with relevant information – such as familiarizing candidates with potential hiring company announcements; e.g. “Did you happen to know we were named one of the best places to work 4 years in a row” or “We were rated as the safest operating room to work in St. Louis”. Email Campaigning has resulted in a two-to-three times increase in passive candidate responses
  • Video interviewing: Both live and prerecorded interviews of candidate presentations. Managers feel more informed of when to take candidates to the next step. Team interviewing is also conducted
  • Employment branding and social recruiting: All about making a connection with the candidate to “get them in the door”. Includes training and education on how to properly use social media to send out positive messages.

Client Tour

We toured the Brookfield facility where ~60% of employees work. The tour included:

  • Understanding how employees are recognized
  • How virtual employees are connected and communicated with as though they were onsite in Brookfield
  • Demos of some of the innovations, including email campaigns to build talent pipelines
  • A visit to the Impression Center.

The Impression Center, which receives 250k calls per year, is staffed by customer service experts who are imperative to potential candidates’ first impression of the company. Applicants and candidates can call the center with questions throughout the job offer, and live chat is also offered. First call resolution is 96% with 97% customer satisfaction. Over 63k interviews have been scheduled by the Impression Center. Candidates may still contact the recruiter if needed; however, by using the Impression Center there has been a 97% reduction of calls to recruiters, allowing them to focus on their primary concern – recruiting.

Pinstripe Analyst Briefing

Pinstripe has grown from ~450 employees and ~73,000 hires in 2011 to ~575 employees today and nearly 100,000 hires in 2012. Most recruitment contracts at Pinstripe are end-to-end, full service RPO as opposed to projects. Several of the more recent contracts have been second- and third-generation RPO clients. Pinstripe’s partnership with Ochre House, formed in 2009 to deliver RPO in EMEA and Asia-Pacific, has been awarded several contracts to fill multi-regional hiring needs. Both companies attribute their success to sharing similar values. Honeywell is an example of a second-generation client now expanding beyond North America to Europe that Ochre House will serve. Combined with Ochre House, RPO is provided to ~85 clients in 45 countries in 23 languages.

Summary

One of the key messages taken from this summit is that Pinstripe is keenly focused on the candidate experience and a positive work environment for its employees to excel at satisfying client needs. It is therefore of no surprise that Pinstripe recruiters have an average of >9 years’ experience.

Interested in reading the latest HRO news from NelsonHall? Subscribe to our newsletter by clicking here.

The Rise of Smartphone Apps in Benefits Administration

November 16, 2011

Over the past year, HRO service providers have launched various smartphone apps. One of the first apps I became aware of was ADP’s RUN app for small business owners. It’s been interesting monitoring the progress of this app since its launch in October 2010. Within six months, it reached 100,000 users while only available for Apple devices. It has since been made available to the Android and RIM platforms, adding even more users.

Payroll seemed like an ideal place for HRO service providers to develop apps. ADP then took it one step further and launched the ADP Mobile Solutions app, which provides users with HR, payroll, and benefits information including retirement savings information such as current 401(k) allocations, distribution percentages, account balances, and rates of return.

Towers Watson also has an app, TWGlobal50. It provides HR and benefits professionals with various information including planned pay increases, changes in employee engagement levels, talent mobility interest rates, and changes in healthcare benefit costs.

Unlike payroll, apps within benefits administration can cover a broad range of topics such as Morneau Shepell’s My EAP app, which provides the following:

  • Health and wellness articles (from its workhealthlife.com website)
  • Access to confidential e-counseling
  • LifeSpeak On Demand video clips on a range of personal and work-related topics.

Other apps available from benefits administration providers allow users to access more personalized data. For example, Buck Consultants’ Benefits Genie Lite and Benefits Genie apps enable users to track a wide variety of health and insurance information for themselves or other family members including:

  • Allergy information
  • Prescription medications
  • Vaccinations
  • Operations
  • Family history
  • Physician contact information
  • Benefits co-payments and deductibles, etc.

Although not an app per se, Aon Hewitt is also enabling its client employees to access their personal health and retirement information from smartphones via secure websites, allowing users to make changes to their retirement plans and even enroll for benefits.

These more interactive personalized apps make it easy for employees to stay connected and engaged as more responsibility is being shifted on individuals to manage their own retirement savings and health. Also, with healthcare reform, we are likely to see apps expanding to new areas such as healthcare exchanges.

Mobile access from any device will quickly move from a differentiator to a requirement, including for HRO. The difficulty is the development time, costs, and security challenges for services that will not likely generate new revenues as much as protect revenues and support continued growth. Technology investment decisions will be critical in staying current and still managing needed margins.

Stay tuned.

Amy L. Gurchensky, Research Analyst, HRO, NelsonHall

 

Interested in reading the latest HRO news from NelsonHall? Subscribe to our newsletter by emailing amy.gurchensky@nelson-hall.com with “HRO Insight” as the subject.

Employee Engagement, High Performance, and HRO

April 13, 2011

Employee engagement is down to the lowest levels seen in many years. Low engagement makes it hard to be high performing and can later raise turnover as employment opportunities improve.

  • In early 2010, The Conference Board found that only 45% of employees were satisfied with their job, the lowest rate seen in the 22 years of the survey.
  • This year, the 2011 Aon Hewitt Trends in Global Employee Engagement survey found that 56% of employees are engaged on average, down from 60% in the prior year, the largest year-over-year drop seen in 15 years. Declines were seen across Asia-Pacific, Europe, and North America, with only Latin America showing improvement.

My colleague, Gary Bragar, has consistently brought attention to the engagement topic because it is important and makes a difference for all: employers, employees, and HRO service providers. It can also make quite a difference! Aon Hewitt’s research indicates there is a strong correlation between employee engagement and financial performance. Organizations with high levels of engagement (65% or more) outperformed the total stock market index and had shareholder returns 22% higher than average in 2010. Companies with low engagement (45% or less) had shareholder returns 28% lower than the average.

Naturally, employee engagement that contributes to high performance business results is first and foremost a critical issue for C-level and management teams and there is a myriad of advice available, including consulting services from many of the HRO providers. Every organization, industry, and market has a life cycle and the management challenges will vary depending upon the stage. Accenture’s new book, “Jumping the S-Curve,” identifies three s-curves and outlines the critical issues for each cycle, including the importance of transitioning from one stage to another.

I see within the very insightful Accenture management advice opportunities for HRO contributions. For example, to climb the cycle of business success based on a winning idea, you need to reach a threshold of capabilities and competence and to attract and keep top talent in critical areas to maximize growth without collapse. As the cycle of achieving business success begins to end, new talent problems can arise as turnover increases due to fewer advancement opportunities and talent poaching. As a new cycle starts, a change may be needed in leadership and business competencies at the executive and other levels. Talent needs to be continually monitored, nurtured, and refreshed – all appropriate to the current and next cycle of the enterprise and what is happening in the broader market and economy.

Layering talent management services (e.g., recruiting, staffing, performance management, succession and career planning, and workforce planning) on top of a capable HR system for employee data management that’s supported by HR analytics can go a long way in helping clients see where they are now, identify gaps and emerging issues, and use HRO services and support to achieve a truly high performance-based business transformation.

Linda Merritt, Research Director, HRO, NelsonHall

Employee Engagement: Outsourcing Providers Get It

March 3, 2011

I finally listened to my first two Bill Kutik radio shows and I’m glad I did (replays are available online).  Two weeks ago, Bill interviewed Mary Sue Rogers, General Manager of Global HR, Learning and Recruiting for IBM, who shared her perspectives on HRO.

More recently, Bill interviewed Rudy Karsan, CEO of Kenexa, for his views on balancing work and life and the nature of how jobs are changing with insights from his recently co-authored book titled “We: How to Increase Performance and Profits through Full Engagement.”  Research findings cited from global employee surveys and company case studies revealed three essential elements that keep employees engaged and productive: pay, purpose and passion.  During the interview with Bill, Rudy noted a January 2010 study which indicated that 45% of employees were disengaged.  That figure is now a staggering 84% (Ouch!).  Just think of the productivity that would occur if companies could make that 84% engaged.

To measure employee engagement, Rudy states that companies must first measure employee engagement though employee surveys.  Once those results are compiled and analyzed, conversations on how to improve need to occur with employees.  Having managed employee programs including employee satisfaction for a global telecom for a few years in my prior life, I can attest to all the amazing things that happen when employees become engaged!

Another important element in employee engagement is to analyze employee actions and anticipate trends before they become major problems.  In her discussion with Bill, Mary Sue emphasized the wealth of workforce information that is already inherent in HR data warehouses and systems.  An experienced HRO vendor can help connect the systems, provide the HR analytic tools, and even assist in building an engaged employee base, which is critical for success in an ever-changing global business environment.

An example of another HRO provider walking the talk is HCL.  Vice Chairman and CEO Vineet Nayar penned his management philosophy in his 2010 book titled “Employees First, Customers Second,” which says it all.

So, why aren’t more companies actively trying to ascertain employee satisfaction?  I could write my own mini novel on all of the excuses organizations give, but rather I’ll simply say just do it.  If you have the resources and the commitment, employee engagement can be managed internally.  But, if you don’t have the bandwidth, talent management providers such as Kenexa and OchreHouse have the capability to help.  In either case, companies must be committed to the process, from senior leaders down to first line supervisors.  If you don’t have the commitment to doing anything with the results, then my advice is don’t bother measuring to begin with as you risk disengaging employees more.  As an organizational leader, which side of the 84% do you want to be on?

Gary Bragar, Lead HRO Analyst, NelsonHall