Take Care to Show You Care – of Humanity and HRO

If you are in the business of caring for people, you have to show you care about people.

In the HRO community we all are in the business of caring for people, as employees, as managers and as retirees. We provide products and services that help people at every stage of working life and beyond. Much of that care is administrative, automated and drives to self-service and efficiency, as well it should. Sometimes we get to show employee care in a more direct manner, such as calls with live agents to understand the variety of benefit actions and options needed to wend through a major life event, or use of a caring tone when helping process an unexpected leave of absence during a personal or family crisis.

There are other ways to show you care in this professional space we have chosen to serve, such as corporate social responsibility activities and philanthropic initiatives.

HRO service provider examples include: 

• ACS Government Healthcare Solutions has a dental outreach program for disadvantaged children which has expanded from one to ten states

• Convergys highlights its Social Responsibility Community focus with examples of worldwide projects, including many teacher training and education programs

• Accenture uses its consulting and IT expertise in its Skills to Succeed effort to build skills that will enable people all over the world to participate in and contribute to the economy

• IBM, befitting its size and global reach, sponsors many varieties of programs. One that caught my eye is Kid Smart for early learning development that has reached 60 countries and has won IBM accolades from the highest levels in some countries

Then there are the times of crisis like a hurricane, a tsunami and now the earthquake in Haiti. How do we in the HRO community lend our skills and capabilities when natural disasters strike?

Many companies, which also happen to be HRO clients, excel in business-aligned philanthropy. For example, as it relates to the catastrophic earthquake in Haiti last week, GlaxoSmithKline donated cash and medicine worth $1.8 million, mostly urgently needed oral and topical antibiotics, and has promised further commitments as local infrastructure is repaired. AT&T immediately gave $50,000 to help bring emergency telecommunications to Haiti, supports the American Red Cross’ text donation program (in the U.S. text the word Haiti to 90999 and a one time charge of $10 will be added to your cell phone bill), and has pledged $200,000 to the Red Cross this year alone for disaster relief. And the State of Florida called upon its citizens to donate money to its “Neighbors to the Rescue” program through the Florida Disaster Recovery Fund.

Ceridian is making sure its Life Works customers know that services are available for employees concerned about friends and family in Haiti, and it has also listed some contact and resource information for the general public on its website, including several in Creole.

Hewitt posted a Red Cross press release for Thursday’s CHICAGO HELPS HAITI telethon in which 1,500 employees will volunteer their time staffing the phone banks from its Lincolnshire headquarters and three other centers.  The press release also mentions, “The last time the Red Cross partnered with Chicago media and Hewitt was in 2004 for a one-day telethon to aid victims of the Asian tsunami. The result of that effort was extraordinary.” This is a very good example of using the skills and caring of the company and its employee during a crisis, as well as getting positive media coverage for the significant contribution.

The human impact of major disasters lasts for years, long after the media leaves. That will be the time to consider using ongoing corporate responsibility programs in both nearby communities and markets in which it is most needed. How are you showing you care?

Linda Merritt, Research Director, HRO, NelsonHall

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: hr outsourcing, hr outsourcing research, hro, HRO providers, nelsonhall

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s